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The Steiner Education Approach to Building Resilience in Students

Wellbeing at the heart of education

 Steiner education aspires to support the wellbeing of children and young people by giving them time and space to become free, fully rounded human beings.
Steiner education aspires to support the wellbeing of children and young people by giving them time and space to become free, fully rounded human beings.

At a time when children and young people are increasingly telling us how anxious they are in school, how can educators plan to manage stress and build resilience?


Uniquely, Steiner schools have evolved a curriculum which is informed by an understanding of the nature and development of the human being, especially in childhood and adolescence.


In the early years, up to age six and a half, learning happens naturally through imitation and free imaginative play, in a predictable and rhythmical structure and in a wholesome, natural setting. By working primarily with a child’s physical body through movement and gesture, the ‘will to work’ is activated, which lays the foundations of motivation and resilience in later years.

In their seventh year, children are ready to discover the world of letters and numbers through experience, narrative, and the creative arts. The children’s learning is supported by the continuity and security of their relationship with their Class Teacher who stays with them for most, if not all, of their Lower School years.


The children’s learning is supported by the continuity and security of their relationship with their Class Teacher who stays with them for most, if not all, of their Lower School years.
The children’s learning is supported by the continuity and security of their relationship with their Class Teacher who stays with them for most, if not all, of their Lower School years.

In the Lower School, the emphasis begins to shift towards learning through ‘feeling.’ The children develop a strong sense of responsibility and independence, and they begin to know themselves.


In their 14th year, when significant changes will be taking place in their brains and bodies, young people enter the Upper School. Here the curriculum begins to focus on thinking. Greater emphasis on abstract concepts in the sciences and humanities is balanced with music, movement, and craft activities. The whole curriculum includes subjects like architecture, botany, bookbinding and surveying which complement the exam courses and allow pupils to broaden their horizons with learning which is inspiring and meaningful.


The Upper School, here the curriculum begins to focus on thinking.
The Upper School, here the curriculum begins to focus on thinking.

At its heart, Steiner education aspires to support the wellbeing of children and young people by giving them time and space to become free, fully rounded human beings.


To experience this ethos firsthand, join an OpenTour on the first Friday of each month during term-time, where families visit lessons ‘in action’ and have an opportunity to quench your thirst to know why this is such a big part of the timetable: October 4th 2024 / November 1st 2024 / December 6th 2024 / February 7th 2025 / March 7th 2025 / May 2nd 2025.


Alternatively, our Head of School, Nick Brett / Education manager, Alistair Pugh will be happy to show you around the campus one afternoon.



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